FSA 2005

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Film Southasia ’05, the festival of Southasian documentaries, was held in Kathmandu from 29 September to 4 October, 2005 and, as with the past editions of the festival, was a highly successful event. The festival fulfilled its objectives of being a forum to showcase the best documentaries made in the past two years on Southasian subjects; bringing together filmmakers from all over the Subcontinent to discuss the non-fiction film in the region; and promote the culture of watching documentaries.

There were notable differences with this fifth edition of FSA. The festival went over six days, compared to four days in the earlier editions and the festival was held at a bigger venue – a newly opened commercial duplex cinema in downtown Kathmandu. (The ticket price was, however, not increased.) While the first four days were dedicated to showcase the latest Southasian documentaries, on the last two days films related to conflict from around the world under the banner, Barrel of the Gun were exhibited. The organizers decided to do this in view of the fact that Nepal was witnessing a violent insurgency which then showed no signs of abating. The festival differed from earlier editions because a new prize category was introduced – Best Debut Film. This is because a substantial number of films screened in earlier festivals had been by first-time makers and they could not compete with the more established names. This new award would be an encouragement to more budding filmmakers to take up the art.

While there were 44 films (all but one in the competitive category) in the Film Southasia panorama, 15 conflict-related films were screened in the Barrel of the Gun section.

FSA ’05 was much more successful than the earlier editions of the festival in several counts. Although the number of entries decreased to 189 films from compared to the 2003 edition in which 230 films were received, from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, UK, US and elsewhere. In FSA ’97, 135 entries were received while in FSA ’99 this number stood at 149 and in FSA ’01, 175 entries were received. The shortfall in numbers was made up by the sheer quality of films. Of the 44 films screened in the main festival, 29 were represented by their makers, who interacted with the audience after the screening of the films and during informal meetings at the festival venue. Although this was the fifth edition of the festival, there were a notable number of filmmakers who were attending for the first time because word of the warmth of the festival has reached far and wide.

Preparation for the event
The preparation for the festival began more than a year before the event. Entry forms were sent to non-fiction filmmakers from all over the region and films were sought extensively. Advertisements calling for entries were published so that filmmakers and the general public around Southasia came to know of the festival.

Once the entries were received the selection committee, comprising of the festival organising committee members and Southasian journalists and filmmakers, sat down to watch the films. Because of the wonderful quality of the films received and the limited slots in the festival, the selection was a long but nevertheless gratifying process for the committee, as in the past events. There were a number of entries which were on Southasian subjects but made by non-Southasians. A notable number of films made for western television audiences were sent as entries. This was important because it shows that Film Southasia is slowly being accepted as an important film festival in the world. Some of the films were sought out because of the importance of the subject matter and because a number of films on Afghanistan were made following the change in the regime there.

As in all previous editions of the festival, each film entered for the festival was discussed intensively for its merits and demerits, only after which a decision was reached. When the final selection was made the films were on diverse subjects: politics to profiles, culture to globalisation, communalism to environmentalism to history.

When the selection of the films was over and as the event drew near, the festival was advertised extensively in Kathmandu. Banners and posters were put all over town, advertisements were placed on leading Nepali newspapers and on the several local FM stations. One of the challenges in this regard was the need to fill the two theatres at Kumari Cinema which had a bigger capacity than the venue used in the past.

The event
The festival was opened by Indian filmmaker Sai Paranjpaye in the afternoon of 29 September at the Kumari Cinema, one of the premier film theatres in the city. The theme of the festival this year was “Revolution in Digital – Go Documentary”. Among the speakers at the opening were chairman of the jury – Tareque Masud, the well-known Bangladeshi filmmaker – the chair of the festival organising committee Kanak Mani Dixit while festival director Manesh Shrestha gave the welcome address.

The opening film was “My Brother, My Enemy” made by Masood Khan (a Pakistani national) and Kamaljit Negi (an Indian national), student filmmakers at a British film school. In view of the warming of relations between India and Pakistan, this film on the first tour of the Indian cricket team to Pakistan in more than a decade was a fitting film for a Southasian film festival.

The 44 films of the main festival were screened back-to-back in two halls over four days. Screenings were well attended in the two theatres which had a capacity of 300 and 234. While in the past editions, audiences had to turn back because of the lack of space in the halls, this time fewer people had to turn back.

The screening of the films represented by the director or the producer present, were followed by lively discussions. The quality of the films was highly appreciated by the Kathmandu audience as well as by the filmmakers who had come to Kathmandu for the event. Receptions were held for the filmmakers so that they could meet and discuss the films.

A Bangladeshi film “Teardrops of Karnaphuli” by Tanvir Mokamel could not be screened at the main venue and had to be shifted quickly to the adjacent Russian Cultural Centre because of censorship issue raised by the Nepal government following pressure from the local Bangladeshi embassy. The film portrayed the lives of the marginalized people in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in the southeastern part of Bangladesh. Fittingly, as earlier planned, discussion on Censorship of the Southasian Documentary was held after the screening.

On 2 October, the last day of the main festival, the three-member jury – which comprised of Hasan Zaidi a Pakistani filmmaker and director of the Karachi International Film Festival and filmmaker Sabeena Gadihoke who also teaches video and film production in New Delhi besides Tareque Masud – announced the awards.

The Ram Bahadur Trophy for Best film was awarded to “Continuous Journey” by the Canada-based filmmaker Ali Kazmi, about efforts of 376 immigrants from British India to enter Canada in 1914. The jury citation for the award read: For creating a powerful film out of scarce source material. For bringing to light a lesser-known historical event and giving it a powerful contemporary relevance. For its meticulous research and highly creative blending of animation, sound and archival material.” The Second Best Film Award jointly went to “I for India” by England-based filmmaker Sandhya Suri about the life of an India doctor who migrated to England in 1965 and “A Certain Liberation” by Bangladeshi filmmaker Yasmine Kabir on the ‘madness’ of Gurudasi Mondol who witnessed the murder of her entiire family during the Liberation War of 1971. Special Commendation went too Nistha Jain’s “City of Photos” and Special Jury Award was given to Rakesh Sharma’s “Final Solution” The Best Debut Film went to “My Brother My Enemy” which was also the opening film of the festival. The first, second and Best Debut Film carried a purse of USD 2000, 1000 and 1000 respectively.

Once the main festival was over, a panorama of 15 films on armed conflict and its aftermath from all over the world were screened on 3 and 4 October at the same venue. The Barrel of the Gun section was inaugurated by Ian Martin, the then head in Nepal of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. There was a tremendous response from the Nepali audience who were caught in the crossfire between security forces and Maoist insurgents. Films were from Colombia to the Balkans and Cambodia to the Middle-east.

Jury Citation

This year we, the jury, were faced with an unprecedented number of good films to choose from. We also had to contend with a diverse expression of form, genre, formats, lengths and subjects that made comparisons extremely difficult. In determining our criteria for selection of films, we emphasized of-course in addition to content, experimentation with form, and newly emerging trends in the arena of non-fiction that has in itself undergone many changes. The boundaries between fiction and non fiction today are more porous and blurred and documentary encompasses within itself a myriad range of practices. In the ultimate analysis any choice by jury may be contentious and is based on personal subjectivity. But in selecting these awards, we have looked for films that would not only stand the test of time but also innovating on the craft of filmmaking in addition to addressing contemporary social history. Read more..

  • Second Best Film Award
    A Certain Liberation
    Year 2003  
    Length 38'  
    Directed by
    Yasmine Kabir
    Language
    Bengali

    Gurudasi Mondol resigned herself to madness in 1971 when, during the Liberation War of Bangladesh, she witnessed the murder of her entire family at the hands of the collaborators of the occupying forces. Today Gurudasi continues to roam the streets of Kopilmoni, a small town in rural Bangladesh, in pursuit of all she has lost

  • Bhal Khabar (Good News)
    Year 2005  
    Length 17'  
    Directed by
    Altaf Mazid
    Language
    Assamese

    The story of a writer looking for a bit of good news in the days of the "Assam Movement" (1985-1990), when the youth had sunk to the lowest depths of degradation, and civilized emotions seemed to be wiped completely out of existence. The newspapers displayed some chilling pages during this time; to read them was to be overcome by an even greater feeling of horror and helplessness.

  • City of Photos
    Year 2005  
    Length 60'  
    Directed by
    Nishtha Jain
    Language
    Bengali,English,Hindi

    The film explores the little known ethos of old neighborhood photo studios in a variety of Indian cities, discovering entire imaginary worlds in the smallest of spaces. Tiny, shabby studios that appear stuck in a time warp turn out to be throbbing with energy. As full of surprises as the people who frequent these studios...

  • Ram Bahadur Trophy For Best Film
    Continuous Journey
    Year 2004  
    Length 87'  
    Directed by
    Ali Kazimi
    Language
    English,Punjabi

    A complex and moving tale of hope, despair, treachery, and tragedy, a revealing Canadian story with global ramifications set in a time when the British Empire seemed omnipresent and its subjects were restless and seeking self-determination. In 1914 the Komagata Maru, a vessel carrying 376 immigrants from British India, became the first ship transporting migrants to be turned away by Canada.

  • Cosmopolis: Two Tales of a City
    Year 2004  
    Length 14'  
    Directed by
    Paromita Vohra
    Language
    English

    In two discrete but thematically linked short tales, this film looks at divisions of class, language, and food, and explores and questions the mythical depiction of Bombay as a great cosmopolitan city. Tale I: The Forgotten City, depicts a city built by workers, a skyline where mill chimneys are replaced by glinting cylindrical high-rises that mimic their shapes ...

  • Days and Nights in an Indian Jail
    Year 2003  
    Length 63'  
    Directed by
    Sunandan Walia,Yugesh Walia
    Language
    English,Hindi

    Days and Nights in an Indian Jail focuses on a handful of inmates incarcerated in Tihar Central Jail in Delhi, the largest prison in South-East Asia, over the course of one year. Raymond, from London, is on remand, accused of smuggling 70kg of heroin. If convicted, he faces the next ten years in Tihar.

  • Dirty Laundry
    Year 2005  
    Length 42'  
    Directed by
    Sanjeev Chatterjee
    Language
    English

    On June 7, 1893, a young Gujarati lawyer was thrown out of a first-class train compartment in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa simply because he was not white. Later this same man would come to be known as Mahatma Gandhi - one of the greatest figures of the 20th century.

  • Special Jury Award
    Final Solution
    Year 2004  
    Length 149'  
    Directed by
    Rakesh Sharma
    Language
    Gujarati,Hindi

    Final Solution is a study of the politics of hate. Set in Gujarat between Feb/March 2002 and July 2003, the film graphically documents the changing face of right-wing politics in Western India through an examination of the carnage wrought on Gujarat in 2002.

  • Ganges: River to Heaven
    Year 2003  
    Length 77'  
    Directed by
    Gayle Ferraro
    Language
    English,Hindi

    In the city of Kashi the power of Ganga, the Hindu mother-goddess of the Ganges River, reigns supreme. Each dawn she calls her children to the ghats, the steps leading down to the water's edge. The young and strong purify themselves in Ganga's polluted waves, while the old and the infirm, too weak for rituals, wait for death and freedom from the cycle of reincarnation by cremation on the sacred river.

  • Girl Song
    Year 2003  
    Length 29'  
    Directed by
    Vashudha Joshi
    Language
    English

    This half hour documentary enters the life of Anjum Katyal, blues singer, poet and mother, capturing her voice as she performs the blues in her home city of Kolkata, as she reads her poems and journal entries aloud to her daughter, and as she converses with her mother of the cultural heritage she is so proud to be a part of

  • Home of the Brave - Land of the Free
    Year 2003  
    Length 52'  
    Directed by
    John Sullivan
    Language
    Not listed

    This one-of-a-kind documentary takes a unique a look at the manner in which the US Special Forces operates in Afghanistan. The film was shot in February 2003 by John Sullivan and Gar Andreassen while staying in Jalalabad under the protection of a local warlord. Never before has anyone followed the actions of the US Special Forces so closely from such a perspective.

  • Second Best Film Award
    I for India
    Year 2005  
    Length 70'  
    Directed by
    Sandhya Suri
    Language
    English,Hindi

    In 1965 Yash Pal Suri left India with his wife and young daughter for medical school in the UK. The first thing he does on his arrival in England is buy two Super 8 Cameras, two projectors, and two reel to reel recorders sending one set of equipment to his family back home and keeping the other set for himself...

  • In the Name of Honour
    Year 2003  
    Length 19'  
    Directed by
    Hammad Ghaznavi
    Language
    English,Urdu

    A documentary that explores honour killing in Pakistan, a horrifying custom in which the members of a family who have disgraced them by breaking social codes, usually young women violating strict laws regarding premarital relations of any kind, are murdered by their relatives in order to save face and preserve the honour of the family name.

  • In The Shadwos of the Pagodas - the Other Burma
    Year 2004  
    Length 74'  
    Directed by
    Irene Marty
    Language
    Burmese,Karen,Shan

    A picturesque journey through fairytale Burma, the Golden Land of a thousand Pagodas that ends in the jungles where hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people live, on the run from the government army.

  • Jaal (The Catch)
    Year 2005  
    Length 67'  
    Directed by
    Hridaynath Gharekhan
    Language
    Gujarati,Hindi

    The struggles of a fishing community casting their nets in the waters of the Arabian Sea off the coast of Sindh in Pakistan and Gujurat in India. Due to a dispute between the Pakistani and Indian governments, both of whom are eager to claim the oil-rich terrain and natural gas reserves found in this region...

  • Journeys
    Year 2003  
    Length 37'  
    Directed by
    Vinayan Kodoth
    Language
    English

    A nearly wordless visual poem, Journeys is a film on the nature of urban excursions in overcrowded cities like Bombay. As jam-packed train rides in Bombay become a mismanaged hell, nearly four thousand people die every year in accidents occurring in their confines. The film builds up a feeling of tense claustrophobia that culminates in an understanding of this world of desperation.

  • Kaalam
    Year 2004  
    Length 27'  
    Directed by
    Ramachandran K
    Language
    Malayalam

    The late legend Pallavoor Appu marar's name is remembered by all the moment a note is struck on the chenda. His painful childhood with an absentee father and limited traditional schooling created in him an unflinching faith in Lord Shiva...

  • Karnaphulir Kanna (Teardrops of Karnaphuli)
    Year 2005  
    Length 60'  
    Directed by
    Tanvir Mokammel
    Language
    Bengali

    The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) is an area situated in the south-west of Bangladesh bordering Myanmar and India, comprised of three districts, and home to twelve predominantly Buddhist ethnic groups who are collectively known as the "Jumma" nation.

  • Kitte Mil Ve Mahi (Where the Twain Shall Meet)
    Year 2005  
    Length 72'  
    Directed by
    Ajay Bhardwaj
    Language
    Punjabi

    Travel to the world of Punjab. Enter a place where Sufi shrines are worshipped and cared for by Dalits. Listen to the voice of B.S. Balli Qawwal Paslewale, a first generation Dalit Qawwals born of this tradition. Join a fascinating discussion with Lal Singh Dil - a radical poet and Dalit who has converted to Islam.

  • Kora-Rajee (Land of the Diggers)
    Year 2005  
    Length 51'  
    Directed by
    Biju Toppo
    Language
    Kurukh

    For the last 150 years the indigenous Adivasi people have been taken from north Bengal to work on tea gardens in Assam, called Kora-Rajee by the Adivasis. Today their numbers in Assam have been estimated at over 5 million.

  • Lanka - The Other Side of War and Peace
    Year 2005  
    Length 75'  
    Directed by
    Iffat Fatima
    Language
    Sinhala,Tamil

    On the February 22, 2002, after more than 20 years of fighting the Liberation Tigers of tamil Eelam and the Government of Sri Lanka signed a ceasefire agreement. Soon after that the A9 highway that links north and south Sri Lanka was opened to civilian traffic after twelve years.

  • Looking for Amitabh
    Year 2003  
    Length 5'  
    Directed by
    Meenakshi Shedde
    Language
    English,Hindi

    Amitabh Bachchan is the biggest superstar of India's Bollywood cinema, with millions of fans around the world. But how is the idol of such a visual medium received by the blind? Looking for Amitabh is an unusual film that evokes Amitabh through senses other than vision...

  • Manufactured Poverty - Director's Cut
    Year 2005  
    Length 12'  
    Directed by
    Simran Issar,Wenceslaus Mendes
    Language
    English,Manipuri

    Documents the changing livelihoods of the indigenous market women of the Khwairamband Nupi Keithel in Manipur, and explores the challenges that have been imposed on them and their institution by the emergence and continued influence of modern economic models.

  • Best Debut Film Award
    My Brother, My Enemy
    Year 2005  
    Length 42'  
    Directed by
    Kamaljeet Negi,Masood Khan
    Language
    English,Hindi,Urdu

    Pakistan and India were partitioned after Indian independence was won in 1947, and since then these two nuclear nations have been in a virtual state of conflict over a variety of issues. Now, for the first time in fifteen years, the Indian Cricket team is to tour Pakistan.

  • Search For Freedom
    Year 2003  
    Length 54'  
    Directed by
    Munizae Jahangir
    Language
    Dari,Urdu

    Traces the dramatic social and political history of Afghanistan from the 1920's to the present through the stories of four remarkable women: Princess Shafiqa Saroj, sister of the beloved progressive King Amanullah (1919-1929); Mairman Parveen, the first woman to sing on Afghan radio; Moshina, a war widow and survivor of a Taliban massacre; and Sohaila, an exiled medical student...

  • SheWrite
    Year 2005  
    Length 54'  
    Directed by
    Anjali Monteiro,K P Jayasankar
    Language
    Tamil

    SheWrite weaves together the narratives and work of four female Tamil poets. Salma negotiates subversive expression within the tightly circumscribed space allotted to a woman in the small town of Thuvarankurichi, questioning patriarchal mores in a powerful yet gentle manner.

  • Snapshots from a Family Album
    Year 2004  
    Length 63'  
    Directed by
    Avijit Mukul Kishore
    Language
    English,Hindi

    An intimate look at parents, family and relationships from the point of view of a filmmaker son. After graduating from film school, the director captured his parents on film over a period of five years. Quiet moments at home, random conversations, festival prayers; all the myriad events that comprise family life were lovingly and unflinchingly recorded.

  • Sundar Nagri (The City Beautiful)
    Year 2003  
    Length 78'  
    Directed by
    Rahul Roy
    Language
    Hindi

    Sunder Nagri is a small working class colony on the margins of India's capital city, Delhi. Most families residing here come from a community of weavers. The last ten years have seen a gradual disintegration of the handloom tradition of this community under the globalisation regime.

  • Sunset Bollywood
    Year 2005  
    Length 54'  
    Directed by
    Komal Tolani
    Language
    English

    A struggling actor in Bollywood dreams of his big screen break. It arrives, and he skyrockets to stardom. Becoming number one is easy after all - staying there is the hard part. Overnight success is sought by millions, but what happens when the lights go out?

  • Team Nepal
    Year 2004  
    Length 37'  
    Directed by
    Girish Giri
    Language
    Bhojpuri,Hindi,Nepali

    The story of a passionate team of Nepali footballers representing a youth club from the district of Birgunj. This team is given a unique opportunity not often granted to the still-growing community of Nepali football enthusiasts to travel to Sonpur, Bihar in India, to play football in a tournament taking place there.

  • The Boy Who Plays on the Buddhas of Bamiyan
    Year 2003  
    Length 96'  
    Directed by
    Phil Grabsky
    Language
    Dari

    In March 2001, the Taliban destroyed the 'Buddhas of Bamiyan,' the tallest stone statues in the world. This film, shot over the course of a year, follows the story of one of the refugees who lives among the ruins - an eight year old boy named Mir against the magnificent backdrop of Bamiyan and its ruined statues.

  • The Curse of Talakad
    Year 2005  
    Length 48'  
    Directed by
    Sashi Sivramkrishna
    Language
    English

    "Let Talakad become sand / Let Malingi become a whirlpool / Let the Mysore Kings fail to beget sons." This is the Curse of Talakad, uttered, according to legend, some 400 years ago by the wife of a defeated viceroy to the Raja Wodeyar of Mysore. Many firmly believe that the curse did and continues to hold true, and looking at the seeming evidence, there is a definite temptation to agree with them.

  • The Day My God Died
    Year 2003  
    Length 53'  
    Directed by
    Andrew Levine
    Language
    English,Hindi,Nepali

    With footage from the brothels of Bombay, captured with spy camera technology, the film weaves stories of girls and their stolen hopes and dreams, into an unforgettable examination of the growing plague of child sex slavery. Gina was sold into sex slavery at age seven and beaten with sticks and aluminum rods.

  • The Die is Caste
    Year 2004  
    Length 83'  
    Directed by
    Ranjan Kamath
    Language
    English,Hindi

    he film examines the role of the Naxalites of Bihar in Eastern India, also known as the Communist Party of India (Marxist/Leninist) Liberation, People's War Group, and Maoist Communist Centre, as agents of socio-political change who employ violence as a means to their ends. Set against the backdrop of the 1999-2001 parliamentary and Legislative Assembly elections

  • The Legend of Fat Mama
    Year 2005  
    Length 23'  
    Directed by
    Refeeq Ellias
    Language
    English

    The bittersweet story of the Chinese community in Calcutta intertwined with the nostalgic journey in search of a woman who once made the most delicious noodles in the city's Chinatown district. Discover thriving street food, disappearing family-run eateries, mahjong clubs, a Chinese printing press...

  • The Life and Times of a Lady from Awadh: Hima
    Year 2003  
    Length 130'  
    Directed by
    Shireen Pasha
    Language
    Urdu

    This documentary, on 90 year old Hima, explores the extraordinary time in the history of the subcontinent (Awadh after the decline of the Mughal Empire in the 18th century). It traces history, Hima's life, and her relationship and letters with her renowned Talukdar writer father.

  • The New Boys
    Year 2003  
    Length 100'  
    Directed by
    David MacDougall
    Language
    English

    Life in a school dormitory with a focus on group dynamics in the fourth film in the series of MacDougall's long-term study of childhood and adolescence at the Doon School in northern India. The film provides unique insights into the values and training of the Indian middle class and, more generally, postcolonial elites at India's foremost boarding school for boys.

  • The Other Woman
    Year 2004  
    Length 82'  
    Directed by
    ANoma Rajakaruna
    Language
    Sinhala,Tamil

    Growing up in the south of Sri Lanka in a Sinhala Buddhist family, the filmmaker was taught to define the woman who lived next to her as 'other,' a Tamil who belonged outside of her own community. When civil war ensued, the two moved even further apart, Anoma staying within the south, her neighbor moving up north.

 

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  • ‘The Running Hawker’: Shot over a period of three years, the film follows the lives of running hawkers on the trains of South Bengal in India. These hawkers belong to that overwhelming majority of India’s working population (over 90%) who are frequently described as ‘informal’. This informality is constituted by a state of suspension in the zone between legality and illegality. The film attempts a presentation of the question of the hawkers’ livelihood at a time when the world of commodity trade is increasingly moving to bigger sites of supermarkets and malls in India. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #festival #southasia

    filmsouthasia: "‘The Running Hawker’: Shot over a period of three years, the film follows the lives of running hawkers on the trains of South Bengal in India. These hawkers belong to that overwhelming majority of India’s working population (over 90%) who are frequently described as ‘informal’. This informality is constituted by a state of suspension in the zone between legality and illegality. The film attempts a presentation of the question of the hawkers’ livelihood at a time when the world of commodity trade is increasingly moving to bigger sites of supermarkets and malls in India. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #festival #southasia"
    13
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  • The festival is getting closer! Film Southasia Director Mitu Varma was interviewed today on the upcoming event and the soon-to-be-released schedule. Stay tuned. #fsa2017

    filmsouthasia: "The festival is getting closer! Film Southasia Director Mitu Varma was interviewed today on the upcoming event and the soon-to-be-released schedule. Stay tuned. #fsa2017"
    8
    0
  • ‘The Colour of My Home’: No sting, no expose', no scoop on why/how/who engineered the pogrom…just an attempt to understand what it means to be uprooted and then "rehabilitated". What does it take to "move on" after a violent displacement? How do you explain a new home to your child? To live with the tag, "IDP" or "Internally Displaced Person", as described in official parlance? How do you reclaim citizenship in times such as these? #fsa2017 #festival #film #documentary #southasia

    filmsouthasia: "‘The Colour of My Home’: No sting, no expose', no scoop on why/how/who engineered the pogrom…just an attempt to understand what it means to be uprooted and then "rehabilitated". What does it take to "move on" after a violent displacement? How do you explain a new home to your child? To live with the tag, "IDP" or "Internally Displaced Person", as described in official parlance? How do you reclaim citizenship in times such as these? #fsa2017 #festival #film #documentary #southasia"
    3
    0
  • ‘The Cinema Travellers’: A Cannes prize-winning film, this is a journey with the traveling cinemas of India, which bring the wonder of the movies to faraway villages annually. Seven decades on, as their lorries and cinema projectors crumble and film reels become scarce, their audiences are lured by slick digital technology. Filmed over five years, The Cinema Travellers accompanies a shrewd exhibitor, a benevolent showman and a maverick projector mechanic who bear a beautiful burden – to keep the last traveling cinemas of the world running. The film has won ten national and international awards. #fsa2017 #film #festival #documentary #southasia #cannes

    filmsouthasia: "‘The Cinema Travellers’: A Cannes prize-winning film, this is a journey with the traveling cinemas of India, which bring the wonder of the movies to faraway villages annually. Seven decades on, as their lorries and cinema projectors crumble and film reels become scarce, their audiences are lured by slick digital technology. Filmed over five years, The Cinema Travellers accompanies a shrewd exhibitor, a benevolent showman and a maverick projector mechanic who bear a beautiful burden – to keep the last traveling cinemas of the world running. The film has won ten national and international awards. #fsa2017 #film #festival #documentary #southasia #cannes"
    18
    0
  • ‘The Books We Made’: Inspired by the work of Urvashi Butalia and Ritu Menon, who co-founded the first feminist publishing house in India: Kali for Women, the film is about the joy and pain of surviving in two non-lucrative professions: that of writing for small, discerning audiences, and that of publishing, translating and promoting work barely known outside its own linguistic region in India. It looks back on thirty years in publishing and focuses on the feminist politics and friendships that make this survival possible. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #southasia #festival

    filmsouthasia: "‘The Books We Made’: Inspired by the work of Urvashi Butalia and Ritu Menon, who co-founded the first feminist publishing house in India: Kali for Women, the film is about the joy and pain of surviving in two non-lucrative professions: that of writing for small, discerning audiences, and that of publishing, translating and promoting work barely known outside its own linguistic region in India. It looks back on thirty years in publishing and focuses on the feminist politics and friendships that make this survival possible. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #southasia #festival"
    12
    0
  • ‘Sri Lanka, ghosts of war (Sri Lanka, les fantômes de la guerre)’: Seven years after the end of the civil war in Sri Lanka, French journalist Vanessa Dougnac travels through the North of the country searching for testimonies and remains of the conflict. Thousands of civilians were estimated killed in the last months, when the Sri Lankan army launched its final offensive to crush the Tamil Tigers. The documentary tells about the mechanism of a so-called war on terror. It offers the victims the possibility to go against the official version of a perfectly-led military operation, and speak about their own dreadful experiences. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #festival #southasia

    filmsouthasia: "‘Sri Lanka, ghosts of war (Sri Lanka, les fantômes de la guerre)’: Seven years after the end of the civil war in Sri Lanka, French journalist Vanessa Dougnac travels through the North of the country searching for testimonies and remains of the conflict. Thousands of civilians were estimated killed in the last months, when the Sri Lankan army launched its final offensive to crush the Tamil Tigers. The documentary tells about the mechanism of a so-called war on terror. It offers the victims the possibility to go against the official version of a perfectly-led military operation, and speak about their own dreadful experiences. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #festival #southasia"
    5
    0
  • ‘Soz - A Ballad of Maladies’: Of folk, rock and hip-hop, this documentary captures the rhythm and blues of resistance in Kashmir valley. It is a portrait of those musicians and artists who have turned their art into weapons of resistance during periods of heightened state repression and violence in the region. #fsa2017 #festival #film #documentary #southasia

    filmsouthasia: "‘Soz - A Ballad of Maladies’: Of folk, rock and hip-hop, this documentary captures the rhythm and blues of resistance in Kashmir valley. It is a portrait of those musicians and artists who have turned their art into weapons of resistance during periods of heightened state repression and violence in the region. #fsa2017 #festival #film #documentary #southasia"
    14
    0
  • ‘Shepherdess of the Glaciers (La Bergere Des Glaces)’: Way up in Ladakh—at 16,500 feet, somewhere in the Gya-Miru Valley—lives a shepherdess with a flock of 250 sheep and pashmina goats on a huge deserted rock-strewn mountain. Over a year, Tsering shares with us her lonely life among animals in an extreme environment. In spite of these tough conditions, she shows an astonishingly strong spirit. She preserves a traditional ecological way of living. But for how long ? #fsa2017 #festival #documentary #southasia #film

    filmsouthasia: "‘Shepherdess of the Glaciers (La Bergere Des Glaces)’: Way up in Ladakh—at 16,500 feet, somewhere in the Gya-Miru Valley—lives a shepherdess with a flock of 250 sheep and pashmina goats on a huge deserted rock-strewn mountain. Over a year, Tsering shares with us her lonely life among animals in an extreme environment. In spite of these tough conditions, she shows an astonishingly strong spirit. She preserves a traditional ecological way of living. But for how long ? #fsa2017 #festival #documentary #southasia #film"
    8
    0
  • ‘Save Gangamaya’: Ms. Gangamaya Adhikari and Mr. Nanda Prasad Adhikari, a couple from Gorkha (Nepal) sat on a hunger protest in front of the Prime Minister’s residence, demanding justice for the 2004 murder of their teenage son Krishna Prasad Adhikari. They were forcefully admitted at Bir Hospital, however on September 22, 2014, Nanda Prasad breathed his last at his 333 days of hunger protest. On October 19, 2014, the Nepali government promised justice to Gangamaya and ended her 359 days of fast-unto-death. However, justice has not yet been served, and despite her very weak and deteriorating health Gangamaya once again begins her indefinite hunger protest. #fsa2017 #festival #film #documentary #southasia

    filmsouthasia: "‘Save Gangamaya’: Ms. Gangamaya Adhikari and Mr. Nanda Prasad Adhikari, a couple from Gorkha (Nepal) sat on a hunger protest in front of the Prime Minister’s residence, demanding justice for the 2004 murder of their teenage son Krishna Prasad Adhikari. They were forcefully admitted at Bir Hospital, however on September 22, 2014, Nanda Prasad breathed his last at his 333 days of hunger protest. On October 19, 2014, the Nepali government promised justice to Gangamaya and ended her 359 days of fast-unto-death. However, justice has not yet been served, and despite her very weak and deteriorating health Gangamaya once again begins her indefinite hunger protest. #fsa2017 #festival #film #documentary #southasia"
    14
    0
  • ‘Satisal In Inferno (Dadelo Bhitra ka Satisaal)’: A tribute to singers, who, against all odds, have been lending their voices to marginalized underdogs in Nepal for over 50 years. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #festival #southasia

    filmsouthasia: "‘Satisal In Inferno (Dadelo Bhitra ka Satisaal)’: A tribute to singers, who, against all odds, have been lending their voices to marginalized underdogs in Nepal for over 50 years. #fsa2017 #film #documentary #festival #southasia"
    14
    0